The birth of Jesus is described in the Gospels according to Luke and Matthew. The two accounts agree that Jesus was born in Bethlehem in Judea, his mother Mary was married to a man named Joseph, who was descended from King David and was not his biological father, and that his birth was caused by divine intervention.

The nativity is the basis for the Christian holiday of Christmas on December 25th, and plays a major role in the Christian liturgical year. Many Christians traditionally display small manger scenes depicting the nativity in their homes, or attend Nativity Plays or Christmas pageants focusing on the nativity cycle in the Bible. Elaborate nativity displays called “creche scenes”, featuring life-sized statues, are a tradition in many continental European countries during the Christmas season.

Christian congregations of the Western tradition (including the Catholic Church, the Western Rite Orthodox, the Anglican Communion, and many other Protestants, such as the Moravian Church) begin observing the season of Advent four Sundays before Christmas. Christians of the Eastern Orthodox Church and Oriental Orthodox Church observe a similar season, sometimes called Advent but also called the “Nativity Fast”, which begins forty days before Christmas. Some Eastern Orthodox Christians (e.g. Greeks and Syrians) celebrate Christmas on December 25. Other Orthodox (e.g. Copts, Ethiopians, Georgians, and Russians) celebrate Christmas on (the Gregorian) January 7 (Koiak 29 on the Coptic calendar)[3] as a result of their churches continuing to follow the Julian calendar, rather than the modern day Gregorian calendar.

The artistic depiction of the nativity has been an important subject for Christian artists since the 4th century. Artistic depictions of the nativity scene since the 13th century have emphasized the humility of Jesus and promoted a more tender image of him, a major change from the early “Lord and Master” image, mirroring changes in the common approaches taken by Christian pastoral ministry during the same era.

Date and place of birth of Jesus Christ.

The Gospels of both Matthew and Luke place the birth of Jesus in Bethlehem.The Gospel of Luke states that Mary gave birth to Jesus and placed him in a manger “because there was no place for them in the inn”The Greek word kataluma may be translated as either “inn” or “guestroom”, and some scholars have speculated that Joseph and Mary may have sought to stay with relatives, rather than at an inn, only to find the house full, whereupon they resorted to the shelter of a room with a manger. This could be a place to keep the sheep within the Bethlehem area, called “Migdal Eder” (“tower of flock”) as prophesied by prophet Micah in Micah 4:8.Although Matthew does not explicitly state Joseph’s place of origin or where he lived prior to the birth of Jesus,the account implies that the family lived in Bethlehem.Luke 1:26–27 states that Mary originally lived in Nazareth at the time of the Annunciation, before the birth of Jesus in Bethlehem.

In the 2nd century, Justin Martyr stated that Jesus had been born in a cave outside the town, while the Protoevangelium of James described a legendary birth in a cave nearby.The Church of the Nativity inside the town, built by St. Helena, contains the cave-manger site traditionally venerated as the birthplace of Jesus, which may have originally been a site of the cult of the god Tammuz.In Contra Celsum 1.51, Origen, who from around 215 travelled throughout Palestine, wrote of the “manger of Jesus”.

The Quranic birth of Jesus[citation needed], like the Gospels, places the virgin birth of Jesus in Bethlehem.

The date of birth for Jesus of Nazareth is not stated in the gospels or in any secular text.